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Angel Spotlight: Illyria #1

Book Released: 10 May 2006
Review posted: 22 May 2006

Writer: Peter David
Artist: Nicola Scott
Publisher: IDW


 5.00 out of 5 Stars

Reviewed by Adam White

 


Given the dismal misfire IDW had with their first Angel miniseries I was hesitant to try out any of their other efforts, but the fact that Peter David was writing it went a long way towards making the sale. So, with medium hopes, I tried out David’s Spike one shot, which turned out to be excellent, and then his Spike vs Dracula miniseries (currently in progress) which is also excellent. So it was with less trepidation that I bought Angel Spotlight: Illyria, although Illyria is perhaps the hardest character of the Angel-verse to grasp from a writing standpoint; I should have known better though, because David delivers as he always does.

Peter David is one heck of a writer — I have followed him from his legendary run on Incredible Hulk through his more recent excellent efforts on Captain Marvel and Fallen Angel. David is also the best writer of licensed properties out there, with his Star Trek books by far the best of the bunch, and his work on Joss Whedon’s characters also stands tall as second-to-none.

David tackles tough subject matter and comes out on top, and his Illyria shines as brightly as she did during her appearances on the television show.


David takes the newest and most complicated character from that universe, Illyria, and presents an outstanding tale of her quest for what it means to be human and whether remorse is a key factor in the difference between being a human or a monster. David tackles tough subject matter and comes out on top, and his Illyria shines as brightly as she did during her appearances on the television show. David is one of the best all-around writers active in the comicbook industry or elsewhere, and his work here is just another demonstration of his infinite ability.

The biggest surprise in Illyria, however, was the art by Nicola Scott; I had never heard of her before this issue but now she stands poised to be one of my favorite artists. Scott captures the immensely nuanced emotions of Illyria as if Amy Acker was there

Scott captures the immensely nuanced emotions of Illyria as if Amy Acker was there acting on the page.


acting on the page, and perfectly portrayed the subtle movements of the character’s eyes so beautifully originated by Acker. Scott blew me away with her work and cemented her position as the definitive Whedon-verse artist, an accomplishment that is high praise indeed coming from a hardcore Angel fan. I don’t know where Nicola Scott came from, but I have a feeling she’s going to go very far in this medium. Why no one has secured her talents with an exclusive contract, I honestly have no idea.

Angel fan? Buy it. Want to be an Angel fan? Buy it. Don’t even know what Angel is? Buy it, and be introduced to one of the best modern mythologies as told by two of the most talented creators available. As I write this I want to buy the issue, and I already own it, so that’s a good indication that you need to own it too.

—CCdC—

 

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Cover image used without explicit permission in accordance with the "Fair Use" provision of US copyright law.

 

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